install
  1. youngfirstlady:

    A rare photograph of Ethel Kennedy, left, Jackie Kennedy and the president from 1954, before he was in the White House. (x)


    (via itsthecamera)

  2. Madonna.

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  3. wickedknickers:

    Girls with cameras…

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  4. wickedknickers:

    danishprinciple: Marguerite Empey  

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  5. wickedknickers:

    streloff: Photo by Okinawa Soba - OKINAWA_SOBA’S FORMER SECRETARY AND DARKROOM ASSISTANT — Checking Out the Boss’s Stereo Camera

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  6. celebritycameraclub:

    HM Queen Elizabeth with her Leica m3. 

    Copyright © Mirror-Photo 2009 

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  7. lauramcphee:

    Kodak: 1935 is at her fingertips

    (via itsthecamera)

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  8. cameraabscura:

    untitled by fabiolanotte on Flickr.

    Mamiya C33 
    Mamiya-Sekor 55mm f4.5 
    Fortepan 100 developed in AGFA Rodinal (1+50)

    (via itsthecamera)

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  9. hoodoothatvoodoo:

    Photo by Nina Leen

    (via itsthecamera)

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  10. fonrenovatio:

    Mrs Va Va Voooom!

    who’s that woman? I’ve no idea.

    (via itsthecamera)

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  11. Self-portrait by Sally Mann, 1974, from Still Time series.

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  12. kiev4am:

    camerasexual:

    untitled by Džesika Devic  

    Aw, the Instamatic.  Camera of my childhood.  It took these beautiful square-format pictures and they always got developed with a white frame border.  And flashbulbs!  Little plastic cubes that explode.  So weird and bygone.

    (via itsthecamera)

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  13. vintagecamerastyle:

    Photojournalist Jessie Tarbox Beals

    (via itsthecamera)

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  14. youngrabbit:

    From my wonderful day with Tara. I miss that day!

    (via itsthecamera)

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  15. bandh:

    Like everyone who shot on the handful of 20x24s Polaroids made, Dorfman started by renting the camera. She shot portraits of anyone who would pay her, and slowly her style and aesthetic started to evolve.

    “I seem to be the kind of person who doesn’t know where she’s going, but about three quarters of the way there I say, ‘Oh, I’m doing such and such,’” she said. “I would be too afraid to think about [a direction] for fear I would ruin it or that I would be too self conscious.”

    After thousands of shots on the giant Polaroid, some of which hang in permanent collections at places like the National Portrait Gallery, and lasting influence in the photo world for her work, Dorfman refuses to categorize herself as a “name.”

    (via Gear Behind the Career: Elsa Dorfman and the Giant Polaroid Camera | Raw File | Wired.com)

    (via itsthecamera)

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